Sunday, 5 February 2017

Adventures In Stitchcraft - 1937

I am so pleased to finally be continuing with this series. Sometimes life just gets in the way!


The next two print issues in my collection are from 1937, February and March.





Looking back, we know that the world was soon heading towards another war. Europe was deeply troubled, hovering as it was between two world wars, with much unrest. The Spanish Civil War had begun in 1936, with many non-Spanish citizens participating, including Nazi Germany and Mussolini's Italian forces. It was a precursor to the horrors to come.


In Paris, the Exposition of Decorative Arts and Modern Industry was held, with displays such as the Railway and Air Pavilions showing the latest in modern travel, and the Pavilions of various nations.






Germany (left) and Russia (right) - pavilions

 This was one of the last major international events before the war began and it had been dominated by feelings of mistrust and suspicion, particularly between Germany and Russia.


Japan invaded China and seized various cities, including Peking, Tietsin, Nanjing, Shanghai and Hangchow.


Battle of Shanghai 1937


In the US, the Golden Gate Bridge was completed and opened, having taken four years to build.




The pride of Germany, the Hindenberg, exploded while attempting to hitch to a mooring post in New Jersey. 36 people were killed. The explosion marked the end of the airship era.




Amelia Earhart disappeared in an attempt to circumnavigate the globe. There are a number of theories related to the disappearance, some more far-fetched than others, including that she was spying on the Japanese for the US government and that she actually faked the disappearance in order to take on a new identity.




Formerly King Edward VIII (who had abdicated the throne in 1936 to become the Duke of Windsor) married Wallis Simpson in June. After their marriage, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor travelled to Germany (against official British advice), where they met Adolf Hitler.




The coronation of King George VI was held in May. The event was planned to be a show of the might and splendour of the British Empire. The media played an important part in this, as it was the first coronation to be filmed and the first to be broadcast on radio.




The average cost of a new house in the US in 1937 was $4100, which translates to $70,700 in 2017 terms.
The average wage was $1780 per annum - $30,696 in 2017 money.
The average price for a new car was $760, which is approx. $13,000 today.
A loaf of bread cost 9c, being $1.55 now.
Toothpaste was expensive in 1937, a tube costing 35c. This is $6.04 in today's money.


Next week, we will take a look at popular culture in 1937 and look inside those Stitchcraft magazines!



10 comments:

  1. I believe with Earheart there was an issue with fuel and navigation and she was simply lost poor thing. I wonder why the Duke and Duchess of Windsor were so insistent on visiting Hitler? Anyway this has really cheered me up as I have been in hospital (rushed there by ambulance in the middle of the night) for three days with a ruptured/torqued cyst on my left ovary. It is back again! I so look forward to the next issue.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh no, I will have you in my thoughts and prayers. I hope your recovery is speedy and goes well.
      Apparently the Duke of Windsor was very taken with Hitler - thought he was a very charismatic man.

      Delete
  2. A wonderful series, looking forward to seeing inside those magazines.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I hope you will enjoy them.

      Delete
  3. Such a lot of memories there Jayne. Love those vintage knitting patterns!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! Me too, vintage are my favourite - too bad they are sized so small.

      Delete
  4. Lovely to catch up with you again, Jayne. I got very busy with un-blog and un-crafting things towards the end of last year. I so much enjoyed this post. It is interesting to think of all those things happening at the same time and always fun to see the stitchcraft magazines. Thank you very much for linking up with Wool on Sundays :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. Same with me, I think, so much going on and sometimes blogging goes my the wayside. It was a good idea to go monthly.

      Delete
  5. They look like great patterns! Love the history link. 😊

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you - glad you enjoyed them. I love history so really enjoy putting these posts together.

      Delete